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BRITBASE - British Chess Game Archive

Tournament: 41st British Chess Championship • 79 of 165 games (plus 10 play-off games, 3 part-games, 13 games from subsid. event)
Venue: Nottingham University • Dates: 16-27 August 1954Download PGN • Last Edited: Monday 10 May, 2021 4:07 PM Bulletin PDF

1954 British Chess Championship, Nottingham, 16-27 August

1954 British Chess Championship Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Total 
1= Barden,Leonard William London ♦ ½/12 ◊ ½/25 ♦ 1/15 ◊ 1/13 ♦ 1/7 ◊ 1/3 ◊ 1/4 ♦ 1/2 ♦ 0/5 ◊ ½/8 ◊ ½/6 8
1= Phillips,Alan London ♦ 1/30 ◊ ½/6 ♦ 1/29 ◊ 1/14 ◊ ½/3 ♦ 0/4 ◊ 1/7 ◊ 0/1 ♦ 1/20 ♦ 1/9 ◊ 1/5 8
3 Hooper,David Vincent Reigate ◊ 1/19 ♦ 1/16 ◊ 1/4 ◊ 1/21 ♦ ½/2 ♦ 0/1 ◊ 1/20 ◊ 0/5 ♦ 1/11 ♦ ½/6 ◊ ½/8
4 Fazekas,Stefan Buckhurst Hill ♦ 1/27 ◊ 1/7 ♦ 0/3 ◊ 1/11 ♦ 1/21 ◊ 1/2 ♦ 0/1 ◊ 1/6 ♦ ½/8 ◊ 0/5 ◊ 1/12
5 Abrahams,Gerald Liverpool ◊ 1/28 ♦ 0/21 ◊ 1/27 ♦ ½/20 ◊ 1/8 ♦ 0/7 ◊ 1/14 ♦ 1/3 ◊ 1/1 ♦ 1/4 ♦ 0/2
6 Harris,Geoffrey F Stourbridge ◊ 1/24 ♦ ½/2 ◊ ½/23 ♦ ½/8 ◊ 1/9 ♦ 0/20 ◊ 1/15 ♦ 0/4 ◊ 1/18 ◊ ½/3 ♦ ½/1
7 Wade,Robert Graham London/NZ ◊ 1/17 ♦ 0/4 ◊ 1/16 ♦ 1/23 ◊ 0/1 ◊ 1/5 ♦ 0/2 ♦ ½/15 ◊ ½/22 ♦ 1/14 ◊ ½/11
8 Clarke,Peter Hugh London ♦ 1/29 ◊ 1/15 ♦ 0/21 ◊ ½/6 ♦ 0/5 ◊ 1/13 ◊ 1/11 ♦ ½/20 ◊ ½/4 ♦ ½/1 ♦ ½/3
9 Aitken,James Macrae Cheltenham ♦ ½/13 ◊ ½/10 ♦ ½/25 ◊ ½/15 ♦ 0/6 ◊ 1/23 ♦ 1/17 ◊ ½/18 ♦ 1/14 ◊ 0/2 ◊ 1/16
10 Bruce,Ronald MacKay Plymouth ◊ ½/14 ♦ ½/9 ◊ 0/20 ♦ 0/17 ♦ 0/12 ♦ 1/30 ◊ ½/19 ◊ 1/28 ♦ 1/26 ◊ 1/23 ♦ 1/18
11 Wallis,Philip Norman Quorn ♦ ½/25 ◊ 1/22 ♦ ½/14 ♦ 0/4 ◊ 1/17 ◊ 1/21 ♦ 0/8 ◊ 1/12 ◊ 0/3 ♦ ½/16 ♦ ½/7 6
12 Horseman,Derek Geoffrey Coventry ◊ ½/1 ♦ 0/14 ◊ ½/24 ♦ 0/19 ◊ 1/10 ♦ 1/26 ◊ 1/16 ♦ 0/11 ◊ 1/17 ◊ 1/20 ♦ 0/4 6
13 Sergeant,Edward Guthlac Kingston Hill ◊ ½/9 ♦ 0/23 ◊ 1/26 ♦ 0/1 ◊ 1/19 ♦ 0/8 ◊ 1/21 ◊ 0/14 ♦ 1/25 ♦ ½/22 ◊ 1/20 6
14 Anderson,Peter B Glasgow ♦ ½/10 ◊ 1/12 ◊ ½/11 ♦ 0/2 ◊ 1/23 ◊ ½/22 ♦ 0/5 ♦ 1/13 ◊ 0/9 ◊ 0/7 ♦ 1/26
15 Green,Arnold Yorvath London ◊ 1/20 ♦ 0/8 ◊ 0/1 ♦ ½/9 ◊ 1/24 ♦ 1/29 ♦ 0/6 ◊ ½/7 ♦ 0/16 ◊ ½/17 ♦ 1/22
16 Wood,Baruch Harold Sutton Coldfield ◊ 1/26 ◊ 0/3 ♦ 0/7 ♦ ½/22 ◊ 1/25 ◊ ½/18 ♦ 0/12 ♦ 1/21 ◊ 1/15 ◊ ½/11 ♦ 0/9
17 Beach,Thomas John Liverpool ♦ 0/7 ♦ ½/24 ◊ ½/22 ◊ 1/10 ♦ 0/11 ♦ 1/19 ◊ 0/9 ◊ 1/26 ♦ 0/12 ♦ ½/15 ◊ 1/30
18 Newman,Richard Hilary London ◊ 0/21 ♦ ½/26 ◊ 1/28 ♦ 1/25 ◊ 0/20 ♦ ½/16 ◊ 1/22 ♦ ½/9 ♦ 0/6 ◊ 1/24 ◊ 0/10
19 Sunnucks,(Patricia) Anne London ♦ 0/3 ◊ 0/29 ♦ 1/30 ◊ 1/12 ♦ 0/13 ◊ 0/17 ♦ ½/10 ♦ 1/27 ◊ 0/23 ♦ 1/28 ◊ 1/25
20 Streater,Raymond Frederick Crawley ♦ 0/15 ◊ 1/30 ♦ 1/10 ◊ ½/5 ♦ 1/18 ◊ 1/6 ♦ 0/3 ◊ ½/8 ◊ 0/2 ♦ 0/12 ♦ 0/13 5
21 Griffiths,Derek F Birmingham ♦ 1/18 ◊ 1/5 ◊ 1/8 ♦ 0/3 ◊ 0/4 ♦ 0/11 ♦ 0/13 ◊ 0/16 ◊ 0/27 ♦ 1/30 ◊ 1/29 5
22 Thomas,Andrew Rowland Benedick Tiverton ◊ ½/23 ♦ 0/11 ♦ ½/17 ◊ ½/16 ◊ 1/28 ♦ ½/14 ♦ 0/18 ◊ 1/24 ♦ ½/7 ◊ ½/13 ◊ 0/15 5
23 Copping,Peter Fairbairn Swindon ♦ ½/22 ◊ 1/13 ♦ ½/6 ◊ 0/7 ♦ 0/14 ♦ 0/9 ◊ 1/29 ◊ ½/25 ♦ 1/19 ♦ 0/10 ◊ ½/27 5
24 Davey,Stanley Clifford Ipswich ♦ 0/6 ◊ ½/17 ♦ ½/12 ◊ ½/29 ♦ 0/15 ◊ 1/27 ♦ ½/25 ♦ 0/22 ◊ 1/30 ♦ 0/18 ◊ 1/28 5
25 Martin,Geoffrey J Ilford ◊ ½/11 ♦ ½/1 ◊ ½/9 ◊ 0/18 ♦ 0/16 ♦ 1/28 ◊ ½/24 ♦ ½/23 ◊ 0/13 ♦ 1/27 ♦ 0/19
26 Tredinnick,George Harold Foster Purley ♦ 0/16 ◊ ½/18 ♦ 0/13 ♦ 0/28 ◊ 1/30 ◊ 0/12 ♦ 1/27 ♦ 0/17 ◊ 0/10 ♦ 1/29 ◊ 0/14
27 Beaumont,Kenneth Huddersfield ◊ 0/4 ♦ ½/28 ♦ 0/5 ◊ 1/30 ♦ 0/29 ♦ 0/24 ◊ 0/26 ◊ 0/19 ♦ 1/21 ◊ 0/25 ♦ ½/23 3
28 Scarlett,Harry William Cambridge ♦ 0/5 ◊ ½/27 ♦ 0/18 ◊ 1/26 ♦ 0/22 ◊ 0/25 ♦ ½/30 ♦ 0/10 ◊ 1/29 ◊ 0/19 ♦ 0/24 3
29 Hamilton,Eric Middlesbrough ◊ 0/8 ♦ 1/19 ◊ 0/2 ♦ ½/24 ◊ 1/27 ◊ 0/15 ♦ 0/23 ◊ 0/30 ♦ 0/28 ◊ 0/26 ♦ 0/21
30 Watts,Harold Horace Southport ◊ 0/2 ♦ 0/20 ◊ 0/19 ♦ 0/27 ♦ 0/26 ◊ 0/10 ◊ ½/28 ♦ 1/29 ♦ 0/24 ◊ 0/21 ♦ 0/17

1954 British Ladies' Chess Championship

1954 British Ladies Chess Championship Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Bruce,Rowena Mary Plymouth
&;
0 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 Doulton,Joan Frances London 1
&;
½ ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 8
3 Murphy,Cicely Mary Manchester 1 ½
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 1 0 ½ ½ 1
4 Bourdillon,Dodie Denise Alma London ½ ½ 0
&;
1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 7
5 Steedman,Sarah Margaret Glasgow 0 1 ½ 0
&;
1 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 6
6 Fletcher,L (Miss) Richmond 0 ½ ½ 1 0
&;
1 0 1 ½ 1 0
7 Rees,Jane Sadler (Mrs) Derby 0 0 0 1 1 0
&;
0 ½ 1 0 1
8 Henniker-Heaton,Mary A E A London 0 0 0 0 1 1 1
&;
½ 0 1 0
9 Craker,Jean PM London 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½ ½
&;
1 ½ 1
10 Colmer,Deirdre London 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0
&;
0 1 4
11 Chater,Hilda Florence Belfast 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 1
&;
0 3
12 Naidoo,Hilda London 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1
&;
3

¶ Monica Henniker-Heaton corrected to Mary Henniker-Heaton (16 Aug 2017). The player's full name was in fact Mary Araluen Elizabeth Anne Henniker-Heaton (1904-1972).

Rank 1954 BCF Major Open  Total 
1 Dr Jakob Adolf Seitz (Italy)
2 Michael J Haygarth (Leeds) 8
3 Charles Reuben Gurnhill (Sheffield)
4-7 Dr Luiz Tavares Da Silva, Sidney Roy Hossell, Kenneth Whyld, Stephen Wilkinson 7
8-10 Percy Baldwin Cook, D Leilie, R Smith
11-14 John G Brogden, Leslie John Cannon, Richard Frank Holmes, Bernard Landon Wilkinson 6
15-16 Edmund George Ansell, Philip Bernard Sarson
17-22 Francis Eric Beadles, Philip Edward Collier, Douglas Saunderson, Peter M Shaw, D. Smith, D A Thomas 5
23-25 Alfred Dudley Barlow, Ivan Robert Napier, George Henry Simmons
26-30 Lawrence Albert Edward Chaplin, E A Hull, George L Sutton, Donald John Stanley Waterhouse, Arthur T Watson 4
31 G W Davidson
32 Eric J Simpson 3

British Junior Championship.—1 Bernard Cafferty (Blackburn) 9; 2 Peter C Gibbs (Bradford) 8½; 3 K. L. Gardner (Birmingham) 8; D. E. Lloyd 7; J. H. Watts 6½; I. F. Baines, R. A. Fuller, and M. Thompson 6 each. T. T. Godwin 5; R. Ashmore, M. A. Dent, and J. Wright 4½; R. C. C. Black and G. R. Evans 4 each; J. G. Lloyd 3½; D. L. Hawkes 1.

British Boys’ Championship.— 1 K. D. Sales (Wigan) 8½; 2-3 M. F. Collins (Crewe) and B. J. Moore (Birmingham) 8 each; D. J. P. Gray (Exeter), J. W. McLeod (Brighton), and D. A. Tidmarsh (London) 7½; M. Lipton, P. Starling, and M. Ventham 6½ each; P. Gough, K. W. Lloyd, J. B. Thomas, D. A. Toms, and W. Turner 6 each; A. E. Davies, A. J. Davies, J. M. Dawson, S. Harding, A. J. Leggett, M. Macdonald Ross, B. H. Turner, D. Walker, and R. T. F. Williams 5½ each; C. Durston, P. McLaren, M. Nicholson, and J. D. B. Walker 4½ each; M. Curran and B. D. Dore 4 each; B. Beavis, J. H. C. Blasdale, and A. Oakes 3½ each; D. J. Casiot 2½; and M. P. Miller 2.

British Girls’ Championship.— 1 Myrtle Barnes (Bromley) 5; 2-4 M. Evans, B. Kenyon and Margaret E. E. Wood* 3½ each; A. Elliott-Fletcher 3; S. Mann 1½; and Margaret Wood* 1. (* n.b. Margaret Eileen Elizabeth, a.k.a. Peggy Wood, daughter of Baruch H Wood, married Peter Hugh Clarke; Margaret Wood, daughter of Frank Wood, Oxford chess official, married Jonathan Penrose)

First Class.—A. E. Nield (St Leonards) 8½; J. Johnson (Liverpool) and Edward Mann (London) 8 each; D. Brydon (Newcastle) 7½; J. J. O'Hanlon 7; A. Archer, Rev. H. M. Blackett, F. H. Senneck, A. G. T. Stevens, and J. V. B. Thornton 6½; H. Hoey, A. L. Homer, R. H. Rushton 6 each; W. J. T. Dunstan, L. E. Fletcher, O. Pritchard, and T. W. Sweby 5½ each; T. E. L. Chataway, H. Golding, H. R. F. Hemmings, G. A. Peck, and L. Winter 5 each; W. Fedorko, H. S. Littlechild, and F. Matthews 4½ each; J. Bate and M. Morgan 4 each; Rev. A. P. Lacy-Hulbert 3½; D. Fawcett 3; and H. H. Levene ½ (Mr. Levene withdrew after 6 rounds).

Second Class.—P. G. Robinson (London) 11/11; L. W. Oliver (South Shields) 8½; R. D. Hollands (Sale) 7½; Miss N. F. Harris and G. O. I. Melitus 6½; A. Terrett 6; H. W. Bennington and F. C. Shorter 5 each; F. Passingham 4½; S. R. Elvin 3½; —. Kelly 1½; and F. Codling ½.

Girls' Junior Tournament.—June Beckett (Bromley) 7; J. Cooper 6; L. Potter 5; M. Allwright 3½; J. Dawkins 3; Y. Selves 1½; D. Baxter and A. MacDonald 1 each.


The Times, 14 August 1954

The British Chess Federation jubilee congress opens on Monday [16 August 1954] at Nottingham University. With a record entry of 187 players the congress is a fitting memorial to that great patron of the game the late J. N. Derbyshire, of Nottingham.

The entry for the British championship is as follows:—G. Abrahams (Liverpool), Dr. J. M. Aitken (Cheltenham), P. B. Anderson (Glasgow), L. W. Barden (London), T. J. Beach (Liverpool), K. Beaumont (Huddersfield), R. M. Bruce (Plymouth), P. H. Clarke (London), P. F. Copping (Swindon), S. C. Davey (Ipswich), Dr. S. Fazekas (Buckhurst Hill), A. Y. Green (London), D. F. Griffiths (Birmingham), E. Hamilton (Middlesbrough), G. F. Harris (Stourbridge), D. V. Hooper (Reigate), D. G. Horseman (Coventry), G. J. Martin (Ilford), R. H. Newman (London), A Phillips (London), H. W. Scarlett (Cambridge), E. G. Sergeant (Kingston Hill), R. F. Streater (Crawley), Miss A. Sunnucks (London), A. R. B. Thomas. (Tiverton), G. H. F. Tredinnick (Purley), R. G. Wade (London), P. N. Wallis (Quorn), H. H. Watts (Southport), and B. H. Wood (Sutton Coldfield). The tournament lasts for 11 rounds and will be run on the Swiss system, by which players of equal, or near equal, scores are paired off to meet each other. Last year’s champion, D. A. Yanofsky, has returned to Canada and so will not be defending his title, and other notable absentees are R. J. Broadbent and P. S. Milner-Barry. The top three of the British team for next month’s international team tournament in Amsterdam, H. O’D. Alexander, J. Penrose, and H. Golombek, have decided to reserve their energies for that event and are not competing at Nottingham.

The entry for the British ladies’ championship, in which all play all, is as follows: Mrs. D. Bourdillon (London). Mrs. R. M. Bruce (Plymouth), Miss H. F. Chater (Belfast), Miss D. Colmer (London), Miss J. P. M. Craker (London), Miss J. F. Doulton (London), Miss L. Fletcher (Richmond), Miss C. M. Murphy (Manchester), Mrs. H. Naidoo (London), Mrs. J. S. Rees (Derby), Mrs. S. M. Steedman (Glasgow), and Miss M. Henniker-Heaton (London). The reigning champion, Miss E. Tranmer, is not taking part.


Letter to The Times, 6 November 1954

"APPROACH TO CHESS
TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES
Sir,—May I suggest, Sir, that the poor showing of British chess teams against Continental opponents arises from a lack of pugnacity? The long series of drawn games in the championship match between Phillips and Barden lends point to this. Our cricketing friends have the remedy, that is to say they give a premium to the outright win. In the next championship a win should count three points and a draw one to each side. That would not only put a premium on aggressive play but would bring to the fore the young and enterprising players our teams so obviously need.
Yours faithfully,
P.N. WALLIS.
14, Loughborough Road, Quorn, Leicestershire."

... and in the 8 November 1954 edition...

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES
Sir,—It is odd that such a letter as that in your columns to-day from Mr. Wallis should come so soon after an English team had achieved at Amsterdam its best performance in international team tournaments since 1930. Probably your correspondent is referring to the crushing defeat suffered at the hands of the Russians earlier in the year. In that case, however, it was not "lack of pugnacity” that was responsible for our heavy defeat but lack of skill and in some cases of experience. The plain fact was that the Russian team consisted of players much better than ours in every department of the game.
The cause for the long series of draws between Barden and Phillips is simply that this is an even match between two players Of highly similar style. That it is a purely fortuitous occurrence in British chess is shown by the course and result of the previous play-off for the British Championship which took place m 1947 between Broadbent and Golombek. In that match Golombek won three games, Broadbent won one, and only two were drawn. This does not mean that Messrs. Barden and Phillips have less aggressive intentions than Broadbent and Golombek, but merely shows that the two latter players had dissimilar styles of play.
Apart from the fact that many cricketers are discontented with the artificial form of awarding points for matches, it must also be observed that no true parallel can be drawn between cricket and chess. So numerous and so grave are the objections that one can hardly take seriously the suggestion that three points should be allotted for a win and one for a draw. For instance, why should a sternly fought game that ended in a draw between two of the strongest players in a tournament between an acknowledged master and promising young player, be reckoned as of so much less weight than a win against one of the weakest players ?
And then, how strange and useless it would be to have one set of values in this country and quite another in the rest of the world. Chess is essentially international, and the erection of so great a barrier as is implied by this point system would do the game nothing but harm here.
I am, Sir, yours, &c.,
YOUR CHESS CORRESPONDENT November 6.

... 12 November 1954, The Times

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES
Sir,—May I, as one of the participants, add my comments to the letters from Mr. Wallis on November 6 and from your Chess Correspondent on November 8 about my match with Phillips for the British Championship ? I believe that the large number of draws was caused neither by lack of pugnacity nor by similarity of style. My strength lies in knowledge of the opening and Phillips’s in aggression in the middle game. Both of us had prepared carefully for the match, so much so that Phillips never emerged with a significant disadvantage from the opening, while I was able to divert the game into other channels whenever he began to prepare a king-side attack. In this way our respective strengths were cancelled out.
A second factor contributed to the large number of draws. After the fifth game each player knew that a single slip would cost him the match, and consequently tended to adopt a waiting strategy not characteristic of the normal tournament style of either of us. I believe the arrangements for such matches in future would be improved if it was decided that, in the event of an equal score after six games, the winner of the next game would be British champion.
As regards Mr. Wallis’s more general statements, I agree with your Correspondent that "lack of pugnacity" is not the root of our troubles. If it was so one would expect British players to draw their games more often than others: yet, of the 12 teams in the final of the World Team Championship at Amsterdam, only one team drew fewer games than Britain. Further, our final position of ninth in an entry of 26 is excellent when one realizes that five of the eight countries above us receive considerable State aid, with all the advantages that that implies.
Yours, &c., L. W. BARDEN
89, Tennison Road, South Norwood.


Press reports of a food shortage during the congress (on the English Chess Forum - plus reminiscences by Leonard Barden)


File Updated

Date Notes
26 April 2016 74 of a possible 165 games, plus 3 game fragments, 13 games from other sections and the 10 games of the Barden-Phillips play-off match. Full results and crosstables.
2 May 2021 Now 79 of a possible 165 games, etc, with the addition of Dr Aitken's missing games, input by Geoff Chandler. I've also added some crosstable information, full forenames, etc.