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BRITBASE - British Chess Game Archive

Tournament: 7th British Championship (won by HE Atkins) (34 games / 66, includes 29 games from subsid. events)
Venue: Oxford • Dates: 15-26 August 1910 • Download PGN updated Tuesday 11 May, 2021 5:31 PM

1910 British Chess Championship, Oxford, 15-26 August 1909« »1911

1910 British Chess Championship Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Atkins,Henry Ernest Leicester
&;
½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1
2 Blackburne,Joseph Henry London ½
&;
1 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1
3 Yates,Fred Dewhirst Birstall 1 0
&;
1 0 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 0
4 Blake,Joseph Henry London ½ 1 0
&;
0 ½ 1 0 ½ 1 1 1
5 Wainwright,George Edward London 0 1 1 1
&;
1 0 0 ½ 0 1 1
6 Colman,Eugene Ernest Straits Settlement 0 ½ 0 ½ 0
&;
½ ½ 1 1 1 0 5
7 Paley-Hughes,William Alfred Hastings ½ 0 0 0 1 ½
&;
1 1 0 0 1 5
8 Gibson,William P Glasgow 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 0
&;
1 0 0 ½
9 Lewis,John A Liverpool 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0
&;
1 1 1
10 Smith,Stephen Francis (Dr) London 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
&;
0 1 4
11 Smith,Frank Scuse Oxford 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1
&;
1 4
12 Brown,Fred Dudley 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 0 0
&;

"British Chess Federation: The Oxford Congress:—The following twelve have been selected to play in the Britich Championship Tournament at the Oxford Congress this month: J. H. Blackburne, J. H. Blake, E. C. [typo] Colman, Dr S. F. Smith, and G. E. Wainwright, London; Fred. Brown, Dudley; W. Gibson, Glasgow, H. E. Atkins, Huddersfield; J. Lewis, Liverpool ; F. D. Yates, Birstall ; F. S. Smith, Oxford; and W. Paley Hughes, Hastings.

"Oxford Congress Brilliancy-Prizes: Mr. Hoffer has adjudicated on the seventeen games sent in for these prizes, and has issued his re­port. The chief prize of £5, presented by Mr Naumann, has been divided equally between Messrs J. H. Blackburne and William Gibson (Glasgow) for games against Messrs F. S. Smith and J.H. Blake respectively. The Bishop of Trinidad's £2 2s prize has been divided between Messrs F. S. Smith, W. H. Gunston and J. E. Parry, for games against Messrs Brown, Shories, and Funk. Mr E. N. Frankenstein’s special prize for ladies has been held over, no game having attained the requisite standard of brilliancy." (Falkirk Herald - Wednesday 28 September 1910)

1910 British Ladies Championship Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Mrs Mary Mills Houlding Newport
&;
1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 9
2 Miss Agnes Bradley Lawson West Hartlepool 0
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1
3 Mrs Gertrude Alison Anderson Woldingham 0 0
&;
½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1
4 Mrs Frances Dunn Herring Brighton 0 ½ ½
&;
½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 1
5 Miss Alice Grace Ruchon St Leonards 0 ½ 0 ½
&;
1 1 1 1 ½ 0 1
6 Miss Ann Dick Smith Cuninghame Edinburgh 1 0 0 0 0
&;
1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½
7 Mrs Emily Margaret Stevens Hastings 0 0 0 1 0 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 5
8 Miss Georgiana Watson Hastings 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 0
&;
1 1 ½ 1 5
9 Mrs Amabel Nevill Gwyn Moseley Oxford 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
&;
1 0 1 3
10 Mrs Annie Sophia Roe London 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0
&;
½ 0 3
11 Miss Alice Taylor Edinburgh 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 1 ½
&;
0 3
12 Mrs Helena Eliza Sidney Hove 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 1
&;

"For the British Ladies’ Championship Tournament the competitors are Mrs A. S. Roe, London; Mrs Anderson, Waldingham; Miss Lawson, W. Hartlepool; Mrs Sidney, Hove; Miss Watson, Hastings; Mrs Herring, Brighton; Mrs Moseley, Oxford; Miss Ruchon and Mrs Stevens, Hastings: Miss Smith-Cunninghame and Miss Taylor, Edinburgh; and Mrs Houlding, Newport. [The same newspaper, dated 24 Aug 1910, referred to Miss Ruchon as "of St Leonards"]

1910 British Major Open Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 William Hewison Gunston Cambridge
&;
½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 9
2 James Chrismas Waterman Bury St Edmunds ½
&;
1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1
3 Alexander Parker Thomas Kerr Birmingham 1 0
&;
1 1 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 7
4 Georg Schories Bradford 0 1 0
&;
1 ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 7
5 Arthur George West Yeovil 0 1 0 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 7
6 John Ellis Parry Bangor 0 0 1 ½ 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 1
7 Carrick Wardhaugh Glasgow 0 0 0 0 1 0
&;
1 1 1 1 1 6
8 John James O'Hanlon Portadown 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
&;
0 1 1 1 5
9 Allan William Edward Louis London ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 1
&;
1 1 1 5
10 Frank Brown Dudley 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
½ 1
11 E Funk London 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½
&;
1
12 Climenson Yelverton C Dawbarn Liverpool 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1

"The Major Open Tournament will consist of R. E. Lean, Brighton; J. E. Parry, Bangor; A. P. T. Kerr, Birmingham ; J. C. Waterman, Bury St Edmunds; A. Lewis and E. Funk, London; Frank Brown, Dudley; G. Shories, Bradford; W. H. Gunston, Cambridge; C. Y. C. Dawbarn, Liverpool; C. Wardhaugh, Glasgow; and J. J. O’Hanlon, Portadown.

1910 First-Class Amateur Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Edward Davidson Palmer London
&;
1 0 1 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 1 0
2 Frank Raven Adcock Norwich 0
&;
1 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 7
3 Thomas Wilfrid Letchworth London 1 0
&;
½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 6
4 John MacAlister London 0 ½ ½
&;
0 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 6
5 Ronald George Dixon Addey French Park 0 1 ½ 1
&;
1 0 1 0 1 0 0
6 Samuel Walter Billings Cheltenham 1 0 0 ½ 0
&;
1 1 0 1 ½ ½
7 John Crum Inveresk 0 ½ 1 1 1 0
&;
0 1 0 0 1
8 Alfred Leonard Stevenson Cheltenham 0 1 0 ½ 0 0 1
&;
½ 1 1 ½
9 Francis Percival Wenman London ½ 0 ½ 0 1 1 0 ½
&;
0 1 1
10 Edward Algernon Michell London 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
&;
1 1 5
11 Alfred Cliff Harpenden 0 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 0
&;
1 4
12 Harry Moss Sleaford 1 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0
&;
3

¶ BCM gives the misprint "G Crum" in the crosstable.

"The entries for the First-Class Tournament are: T. W. Letchworth, J. Macalister, E. A. Michell, and E. D. Palmer, London; R. G. Dixon Addey, French Park; J. Crum, Inveresk; H. Moss, Sleaford; A. West, Yeovil; F. R. Adcock, Norwich; A. Cliff, Harpenden; A. L. Stevenson and S. W. Billings, Cheltenham." (Falkirk Herald, Wednesday 3 August 1910)

1910 Second-Class A Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 H A James Liverpool
&;
0 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 1 1 1d
2 Rev. Arthur Baker Truro 1
&;
½ 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1d
3 John George Rennie Stoke Green 0 ½
&;
1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1d
4 William John Berryman   0 0 0
&;
1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1d 7
5 Leonard Illingworth Brentwood ½ 1 0 0
&;
½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1d
6 George Dickson Hutton Falkirk 0 0 0 0 ½
&;
1 1 1 1 1 1d
7 H(arry?) Brigg London 0 0 1 0 ½ 0
&;
1 ½ 1 1 1d 6
8 Edward James Fairchild St Albans 0 0 1 ½ 0 0 0
&;
1 1 1 1d
9 H B Williams Sleaford 1 1 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0
&;
0 ½ 1d
10 Rev. Charles Fenton Bolland Bridgwater 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
&;
½ 1d
11 Alfred Henry Owen Birmingham 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½
&;
1d 2
12 NN   0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d
&;
0

 

1910 Second-Class B Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Harry Ford London
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1
2 William Souter Mackie ¶ Oxford University 0
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 8
3 John Matthias Bee Cambridge ½ 0
&;
0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
4 Walter Lyle Biggs Oxford City ½ ½ 1
&;
0 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½
5 T Samuel Abergele 0 ½ ½ 1
&;
½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1
6 Alfred Lindsay Densham Croydon ½ 0 0 0 ½
&;
0 1 0 1 ½ 1
7 George Arthur Youngman Maidstone ½ 0 0 ½ 1 1
&;
0 0 ½ 0 1
8 Rufus Henry Streatfeild Stevenson Tunbridge Wells ½ 0 0 0 ½ 0 1
&;
½ 0 1 ½ 4
9 George Moore Frean Bournemouth 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 ½
&;
½ ½ ½ 4
10 Wyndham Henry Gundry Exeter 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 ½
&;
½ ½
11 Frederick William Forrest Shrewsbury 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½
&;
0
12 William Henry Greenhalgh Dawley 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1
&;

Biographical footnote: William Souter/Soutar Mackie (1886 - 17 June 1980) went on to become a professor of English language at the university of Cape Town (1921-1951). M.A. (Aberdeen), B.A. (Oxford). Until 1921 he was Head of the Department of English at Southampton University College. He won the Cape Town club championship and returned to England regularly to play in BCF Congresses until the 1960s - JS

1910 Third-Class A * Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Major Francis Hooper Rawlins ¶ Ampthill
&;
0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 David Jones Blaina 1
&;
½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 9
3 W R Todd Crossgar ½ ½
&;
1 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1
4 William Penberthy Tredegar 0 0 0
&;
½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 J Ough Liskeard 0 ½ 1 ½
&;
1 0 0 1 1 1 1 7
6 Francis Mountain Oxford 0 0 0 0 0
&;
½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 5
7 Henry Ashwell Cadman Gomersal 0 0 ½ 0 1 ½
&;
0 ½ 1 0 1
8 Mrs [Jane] Conybeare (née McDowell) Oxford 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
&;
0 0 1 0 4
9 James Haddon Overton § Woodstock 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1
&;
½ 1 0
10 Edwin John Thurston Catton Bledlow 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½
&;
0 1
11 Mrs [Vera?] Whitehead Rudgwick 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
&;
1 3
12 Mrs Elizabeth Fanny Jones Biddenden 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
&;
2

* the only crosstable available of this section (in the Oxford Times, 10 September 1910, p8) has some anomalies which I hope I have resolved.
¶ BCM seems to think the winner of the section was W Lyon (Ashton) but the crosstable and the results in the Oxford Times (3 and 10 September) say otherwise.
§ Other reports instead have Miss Charlotte Helena Minchin Cotton (London) taking part rather than JH Overton. James Haddon Overton (1855-1921) was the inventor of the 'Empire' clock which was given as a prize for one for one of the competitions.

1910 Third-Class B * Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Total 
1 Percy Osborne Forshaw Yeovil
&;
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10
2 Miss F Wilkins London 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 7
3 E Howes Oxford 0 0
&;
1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 7
4 Selina Charity Kershaw London 0 1 0
&;
½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1 1
5 Charles Gerald Verey Dover 0 0 ½ ½
&;
0 1 0 ½ 1 1
6 B E Hodgson Gomersal 0 0 0 ½ 1
&;
1 0 1 1 0
7 Thomas Archibald Sheldon Oxford 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1 1 1 1 4
8 George Henry Wheeler Beverley 0 0 0 1 1 1 0
&;
0 0 1 4
9 Miss Emily Hunt Barnstaple 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 1
&;
0 ½ 3
10 Mrs Collier London 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
&;
1 3
11 Henry Thomas de Blois Leach Oxford 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 0
&;

* one or two anomalies in Sheldon's score in the crosstable which I hope I have resolved

1910 Third-Class C Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Arthur Compton Ellis London
&;
1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1d 1d 10½
2 Edgar Charles Walters Hannington, Oxford 0
&;
1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 1d 1d
3 Mrs Rosa Annie Banting ¶ London 0 0
&;
½ ½ 1 0 1 1 1 1d 1d 7
4 R Moss Oxford City 0 0 ½
&;
½ 1 1 0 1 1 1d 1d 7
5 Ward Mayhew Parker Mitchell   0 0 ½ ½
&;
1 1 0 1 1 1d 1d 7
6 Emil Kimmerle London ½ 0 0 0 0
&;
1 1 1 1 1d 1d
7 Miss Kate Eyre London 0 1 1 0 0 0
&;
1 ½ 1 1d 1d
8 Philip Leslie Jones Biddenden 0 ½ 0 1 1 0 0
&;
1 ½ 1d 1d 6
9 Miss Emily Eliza Abraham Herne Bay 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0
&;
1 1d 1d
10 Miss Margaret Hunt Barnstaple 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0
&;
1d 1d
11 Default   0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d
&;
- 0
12 Default   0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d 0d -
&;
0

Mrs. Rosa Annie Banting (née Vines, m(1) Slocombe) - obit, BCM, 1932, p66. The other players due to play were A J Smith (Malton) and E O Price (Bangor).

1910 Third-Class D Resid. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  Total 
1 Rev. William Thomas Mackenzie Hooppell Stoke-on-Trent
&;
½ 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 9
2 P T Stephenson   ½
&;
0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9
3 J W Yielder/Fielder Stanford/London 0 1
&;
1 ½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1 1 8
4 James Fish Blackburn 0 ½ 0
&;
1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1
5 George Edward Wainwright, junior Ilkley 0 0 ½ 0
&;
1 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 6
6 Agnes Margaret Crum Inveresk 0 0 ½ 0 0
&;
1 1 1 ½ 0 1 5
7 Arthur Ernest Potter Oxford 0 0 0 1 1 0
&;
1 0 1 0 1 5
8 Frank Round Pickering London ½ 0 0 1 0 0 0
&;
1 1 1 ½ 5
9 William Frank Hobbs Oxford 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
&;
0 1 1 5
10 Mrs A[lice?] Vaizey Halstead 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 1
&;
1 1
11 Mrs Louisa Anne Edie Lewis ¶ Bromley 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
&;
1 3
12 Mrs Hannah Maria Joughin (née Blogg)   0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 0
&;
1

¶ Mrs Louisa Anne Edie Lewis, née Elwyn, 1839-1915, widow of Rev. Lewis Woodward Lewis.

Handicap Tournament (50 entries): 1 Arthur Compton Ellis (prize: 'Empire' clock); 2 W R Todd; 3 George Edward Wainwright, jun; 4 J Fish; 5 J W Dixon; 6 Albert Joseph Basford (Witney).

BCM, September 1910, p382ff

"The seventh Congress of the British Chess Federation was held at Oxford, from August 15th to the 27th [1910], under the auspices of the Midland Union and the Oxfordshire County Association, and fully equalled any previous gathering of the National Chess Society. Indeed, as regards accommodation for play, the venue, New University Examination Schools, situated in the famous High Street, far surpassed all previous experiences of comfort for both competitors and visitors.

As the Morning Post says:—"With its oak panels and beams, and the fine moulded ceiling, this dignified hall seems pervaded by an atmosphere in harmony with the ancient and studious game."

"To those who were fortunate to be able to attend the Congress, Oxford must revive some very pleasant memories. We enjoyed the gathering more than any previous meeting, though we must record the fact that it was our misfortune to miss the Tunbridge Wells and Crystal Palace Congresses.

"The inaugural ceremony took place at 5-30 p.m. on Monday, August 15th, when his Worship the Mayor of Oxford (Mr. Councillor J. E. Salter) extended to all present a most cordial welcome. Supporting His Worship on the platform were the Mayoress, Sir John O. S. Thursby, Bart., president of the Federation; the Warden of New College (Dr. [William Archibald] Spooner), Mr. L[eonard]. P. Rees, hon. secretary B.C.F; Dr. W. P. Emmerton, Ald[erman] Hugh Hall, Mr. E[rnest Edward]. Shepherd (local secretary), Miss Merivale, Mr. Ellis Robinson, Mr. J. Dolbear, and Councillors T. Basson, F. F. Vincent, W. E. Fayers, J. White, and J. T. Dodd.

"The Mayor said he gave them the most cordial welcome possible to Oxford. The Federation had held Congresses at Hastings, Southport, Shrewsbury, London, Tunbridge Wells, and Scarborough, but he could not think that these places, attractive as they were, surpassed Oxford.

"For their competitions they were independent of the weather, but, happily, they had intervals from these which would enable them to discover how much of interest and recreation the University and City had to offer. The present Congress was favoured by the attendance, among others, of Mr. Atkins, the holder of the British Championship, and of Mr. Blackburne, the veteran British master. There were sixty-three British towns represented, some as distant as Liskeard, in Cornwall, and Glasgow and Edinburgh. Ireland also sent several representatives. As the winning county of the Midland Chess Championship—in which some of their city chess players took part—they were specially proud this year to welcome the Congress to the city. In conclusion, he was permitted the pleasure of announcing that Mr. E. N. Frankenstein had very kindly offered a special prize for the most brilliant game played in the British Ladies’ Championship. The Bishop of Trinidad also sent greetings, and hoped to visit the Congress, he further offered a prize of £2 2s. for the second most brilliant game in the ten regular sections.

"Councillor Dodd also extended a welcome to the visitors. In Oxford they, would find very much which deserved their notice, and which would give them enjoyment. For the moment he regarded them merely as ladies and gentlemen whose minds were wholly given over to chess, and who could think of nothing beyond the chessmen and board. He saw on their boards Kings and Queens; they would see much referring to Kings and Queens in Oxford, portraits and beautiful buildings endowed by monarchs. He only regretted that they could not have a King and Queen to welcome them to that Congress. The next best had been done, however, and they had been welcomed by the representative of the King—he meant the Mayor of Oxford, the first citizen. He was glad to see the Mayoress was also present. He suggested they should all see Oxford Castle, which was one of the most interesting features of the City. It was older than the University, and there was some Norman work there of the greatest possible interest. With regard to Bishops, he was sorry to say the Bishop of Oxford was not well. He had no doubt they would see Bishops in the streets, or, at any rate, many learned divines who were quite competent to become Bishops. As far as Knights were concerned, they were better off. The City Council was nominally divided into two parties, although they all worked in great harmony for the good of the City. The leaders of the Liberal and Conservative parties were both Knights, and a representative of the University section was also a Knight. He would like to mention the Pawns—the individual citizens. He was sure they would one and all welcome them, and he hoped they would have a very enjoyable stay in the city.

"Mr. Ellis Robinson welcomed the Congress on behalf of the Oxford Chess Association. He cordially supported the remarks of previous speakers, and said if they had any time to spare it could be well occupied viewing the grand architecture of the Colleges and Churches. When they had looked through Oxford and the neighbourhood, and seen all their beauties, he felt sure that at their farewell meeting they would be able to express appreciation of what the committee had done.

"Sir John Thursby thanked the Mayor of Oxford and the Corporation for their kind welcome. In a Congress like that a great deal depended on the local secretary for the arrangements made for the pleasure and convenience of members of the Congress. He felt they owed a great debt of gratitude to Mr. Shepherd for the attentive work he had done; as he looked through the programme he felt it was varied and attractive to an extent that it had not been their good fortune to encounter before. They had had pleasant gatherings at Scarborough and other places, but he ventured to prophesy that that ancient and beautiful city of Oxford would equal, if not surpass, all records. There was one alteration this year that had been the subject of some criticism. He would point out that the British Chess Federation was established on an entirely democratic basis, and its policy was dictated by properly elected representatives from each of the Unions. This year they had arranged, in addition to the British Amateur Championship, a Major Open tournament, in which prizes of £50 had been given. It was a new feature, and he trusted it would meet with great success, and possibly in future years would attract a more distinguished entry than it had this time. He tendered to the Mayor and Corporation, and to Mr. Shepherd, the cordial thanks of the members.

"The Mayor, in response, said that it had been his privilege to be chairman of the committee which arranged the Congress, and he should like to say that the duties had been particularly light, owing to the services of Mr. Shepherd. He was sure no committee could be better served than the local committee had been by Mr. Shepherd. Whatever success was attained would be due to Mr. Shepherd, who had made all their duties so light. Once more he wished them a most happy and successful Congress.
Mr. Shepherd expressed his thanks for the kind things which had been said. He thought his energy was not yet exhausted, and he hoped to be able to serve them in the coming fortnight. He should like to thank those who had helped him, for he was really receiving thanks for the gentlemen who had assisted him.

"Mr. Rees thought they had had a most auspicious opening, and prophesied that they would enjoy the Congress more than any previous one.

The appended “Welcome to the Chess Congress,” by Mr. Walter Biggs, sen., of Oxford, was published in the Oxford Times:—

Welcome, ye athletes, to these classic shades,
Where many a mental struggle has been fought
By mental toil, when pitted each 'gainst each,
In glorious fight for victory, or when
Opposing Dogma’s dash in furious arms.
Not so with ye, whose peaceful quiet "play"
Shows where the cultured brain
Has deepened into well-thought strategy,
Whose opening fires are hid inscrutably,
Until the final crash of "Check"
Unveils the fatal mystery of doom,
And seals the final victory!

Though "Queens" may fall, and "Kings" may bite the dust,
"Castles" totter, "Bishops’" mitres lie
With princely “Knights” and smaller, humbler "Pawns”—
The honour lies with you—
And ye are welcome!

(¶ the writer of this verse, Walter Biggs, sen (1829-1910), died a few days after writing this poem. His son Walter Lyle Biggs (16 September 1857-1940) was the Oxford Times chess columnist from June 1910, as well as being a music teacher, organist, composer and bookseller. Walter junior finished 4th in the Second-Class B tournament.)

"The serious business of the Congress was mitigated in various ways. On the first Thursday about no members were conveyed in brakes to Blenheim Palace, by special invitation of the Duke of Marlborough, who is president of the Oxford Chess Association, returning after tea, edified and invigorated.

"On the second Tuesday a like number went down the river to visit the beautiful gardens at Nuneham Park. Afternoon tea was served on the return voyage, and the Congressites returned in merry mood. In addition, each afternoon a large party inspected one or two of the Colleges or University buildings, conducted either by Mr. E. C. Alden, Councillor Jackson, or Mr. E. Shepherd, who expatiated on the various objects of interest.

The Play and Players.

"The entry for the championship tourney was not quite so strong as last year. Atkins took the lead in the fourth round, and was never afterwards overtaken ; his usual final score of 8½ giving him a lead of one point. But this point was not gained without much apprehension and difficulty. The scene in the final round was quite as exciting as anything that has been seen in these contests. His game with Dr. Smith had been adjourned in the doctor’s favour, and the analysts of the afternoon were agreed among themselves that he had a forced win. Two continuations after Atkins’ sealed move were in great favour, P—R 6 and Q—B 7; but Dr. Smith adopted neither, but played R—B 4, also a strong move. The board had been barricaded by tables, behind which a crowd of agitated spectators watched the finale. This at length came, Dr. Smith went astray, and finished by losing a Knight by a blunder. Had he won, there would have been a triple tie between Atkins, Blackburne, and Yates.

"Mr. Blackburne has played some capital games, especially against Dr. Smith and Gibson. He cares not now to seek long and difficult endings, and once at least fixed up a draw when the fighting chances were in his favour.

"Mr. Yates shows no signs of his hard work at Hamburg, probably he has benefited by the experience. His great feat was his winning against Atkins a game in which he, from the start, held quite an equal position. The finish of his game with Lewis, too, was a stylish bit of chess.

"Mr. Blake had some ill-luck in the first round, losing to Yates by an oversight. He has played several hard games and conducts an ending with skill and resolution.

"Mr. Wainwright generally plays inspiriting chess, and does not forget that there is a brilliancy prize. He has performed rather unequally in this contest, well beating Blackburne and Yates, but making mistakes with some others.

"So far the prize-winners. Of the others, Mr. Lewis failed to sustain his good form of the first four rounds. Mr. Colman has shewn much ingenuity, but sometimes failed to make the best of end-games. Mr. Gibson, the Scottish player, has done some brilliant work, notably in his game with Blake. Mr. Paley-Hughes lost two games on time limit, and ought to have won from Atkins.

"The twelve competitors in the Ladies’ Championship have all had previous experience in that tournament.

"Miss Lawson, by steady play, kept the lead throughout, and on the last day had a score of 8£ points against 8 claimed by her nearest rival, Mrs. Houlding. As the fortune of the ballot had brought these two ladies in opposition in the final round, their game was watched intently by a large number of interested spectators. Miss Lawson only required to draw, but disdained to play the quiet game, making an unwise capture with her Queen of K Kt P, by which she seriously compromised her game. The little Newport lady rapidly developed her pieces, and won the exchange, and though Miss Lawson struggled on to the 53rd move, she was then compelled to strike her flag, and loud applause greeted Mrs. Houlding as British Lady Champion. Both ladies have previously tied for this honour, Mrs. Houlding, three years ago, losing to Mrs. Herring in the play off, while Mrs. Lawson the next year tied with Mrs. Herring and Mrs. Anderson. Both these latter ladies scored 7½ points in the present contest.

"The Major Tournament did not attract as strong an entry as might have been expected. Mr. Gunston proved in capital form, and won with 1½ points to spare. Mr. Shories appeared to be quite out of form.

"The usual handicap tourney lasted all through the meeting. The prize-winners were :—1st, A. Compton Ellis ; 2nd, W. R. Todd ; 3rd, G. E. Wainwright, jun.; 4th, J. Fish ; 5th, J. W. Dixon; 6th, J. Bashford [more probably, A J Basford (Witney) - see below].

"On Saturday, August 20th, a problem solving competition was held, the judges being Mrs. Baird and Mr. F. R. Adcock. The seventeen competitors were confronted with four problems—two in two moves and two in three, and all agreed they were a stiff lot. Mr. J. Keeble, of Norwich, took first prize, Mr. J. W. Dixon, Hanley, second ; and Mr. A. Louis, London, third.

"The Monday following was Retractor Day. Twenty competitors essayed to solve what is known as a “Variety Retractor,” composed by Mr. E. J. Winter-Wood, and eight good papers were sent in. The prize-winners were :—1st, Mr. P. Wcnman ; 2nd, Mr. S. D. Fresco ; third, Mr. W. Paley-Hughes. The judge was, of course, Mrs. Baird, and the prizes were given by that lady and her brothers, Messrs. E. J. and Carslake Winter-Wood.

"Two lightning tourneys were held. The first [Wednesday 17 August, 40 competitors] was won by Mr. F. D. Yates; 2nd, Mr. A. P. T. Kerr; 3rd, Mr. A. J. Mackenzie; 4th, Mr. J.E. Parry. In the second tourney the prize-winners were :—1st, Mr. I. Gunsberg ; 2nd, Mr. J. C. Waterman ; 3rd, Mr. A. P. T. Kerr ; 4th, Mr. H. Paley-Hughes.

"The final meeting was held in the Examination Schools, at 10 a.m., on Saturday, August 27th. In the absence of Sir John Thursby, the Rev. Canon Gordon Ross presided, and was supported by The Mayor of Oxford (Mr. Councillor J. E. Salter), The Rev. Dr. Spooner, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Warden of New College, who presented the prizes; Mr. Ellis Robinson, Mr. L. P. Rees, Mr. H. E. Dobell, and Mr. E. Shepherd. Canon Ross regretted the absence of the president, and said the Congress had proved most successful, thanks to the work of the secretaries, and the efforts of the local committee. He was glad that they had the Pro-Vice-Chancellor in their midst in that fine hall which had been lent by the University for the gathering, especially as he had been his (Canon Gordon Ross’s) tutor, having become so as an incident arising out of a chess match.

"The Rev. Dr. Spooner said it was a pleasure to the University to be able to offer the room, and he hoped that all would carry away a pleasant recollection of their visit. He was afraid that chess was not quite so much at home at Oxford as at the sister University, but that was only an additional reason why the Congress should be welcomed. It led Oxonians to recognise the value and virtue of chess. They welcomed the Congress, because of all amusements chess became the University best. For the most part Englishmen were accustomed to seek recreation physically, but it was of great importance that some should find it in the most intellectual of all pursuits. It had seemed to him when he looked on at the recent games, that the patience and good temper displayed revealed qualities of much value, and of the greatest difficulty to attain. He had seen losers congratulate their opponents, not only in good temper, but in admiration of their play. This, he thought, was the highest form of virtue, and he was afraid that he had not arrived at it, but he congratulated all present of having reached it in a high degree.

"The success of such gatherings depended on the secretaries, and on behalf of the members of the Congress, as an expression of appreciation of the power of organisation manifested, and the work accomplished by Mr. Rees and Mr. Shepherd, the local secretary, he presented each with a handsome souvenir, subscribed for by the competitors and a few friends.

"Hearty applause greeted the prize-winners, Mr. Blackburne in particular being accorded a most enthusiastic reception.
Fifteen games were entered in competition for the brilliancy prizes offered by Mr. F. G. Naumann and the Bishop of Trinidad. The award will be made by Mr. Leopold Hoffer.

"[British Ladies Championship]... Six prizes were awarded as follows :—Mrs. Houlding £8, with a gold medal and possession of the championship trophy for one year ; Miss Lawson £6, Mrs. Anderson £4, Mrs. Herring £3, Miss Ruchon £2, and Miss Cunninghame £1.

"[First-Class Amateur]... The prizes were :—Mr. Palmer, £8 ; Mr. Adcock, £5 ; Mr. Letchworth and Mr. MacAlister divided £3.


[n.b. hereafter I have edited the BCM text slightly to remove excess verbiage and make scores and prizes more readable, and also added further details of scores from the Oxford Times report from 3 September 1910. There are still some unresolved differences between the BCM and newspaper reports - JS]

In the Third-Class Amateurs’ Tournament, there were prizes of £3, £2, and £1 in each section.


The division of the prize money awarded according to the Tietz system worked out as follows :— Atkins £17 6s 7d; Blackburne, Yates £12 10s 10d each; Blake, Wainwright £7 17s 2d each; Colman, Paley-Hughes £2 16s 9d each; Lewis, Gibson £2 11s 1d each; SF Smith, FS Smith £2 5s 5d each; F Brown, £1 8s 4d. Major Open: Gunston £12 3s 8d, Waterman £7 12s 1d; West, Kerr, Schories £6 1s 7d each; Parry £4 11s 1d; Wardhaugh £3 0s 7d; Louis, O'Hanlon £1 7s 4d each; Brown, Funk 13/8d each; Dawbarn 5/5d.

BRITISH CHESS FEDERATION CONGRESS. [BCM, October 1910]

The Brilliancy Prizes.

Seventeen games were submitted to the judge, Mr. Leopold Hoffer, to compete for the prizes offered by Mr. F. G. Naumaun, £5 ; the Bishop of Trinidad, £2 2s. ; and Mr. E. N. Frankenstein, £2 2s.

Mr. Hoffer, in his award, says that he found no single game entitled to the first prize of £5, and that the efforts submitted by the ladies for the prize given by Mr. Frankenstein were only average games such as constantly occur in ladies’ contests, and in these circumstances he has not awarded the prize.

The award is as follows :—

£2 10s. to Mr. Blackburne, for his game against Mr. F. S. Smith, and £2 10s. to Mr. Gibson, for his game against Mr. Blake. The remaining two guineas to be divided between Mr. F. S. Smith for his game against Mr. Brown ; Mr. Gunston, for his game against Mr. Shories ; and Mr. Parry, for his game against Mr. Funk.

Mr. Hoffer further states that the award to Mr. Gibson must be qualified by mentioning that although the sacrificing combination was not quite sound, the defence was so difficult that Mr. Blake could only find the right reply after analysis. In the actual game the combination was good enough, as shown by the result, and extremely pretty.


File Updated

Date Notes
August 2015 Original upload. Many thanks for help with games and names, etc, from Gerard Killoran, Richard James, David McAlister and Tim Harding. Much of our discussion on the subject may be read on this English Chess Forum thread.
3 May 2016 Corrected the score of the game SF Smith-Blackburne (Rd 6) with the move 18...Rfd8 (not 18...Re8).
27 April 2018 Added two moves (each colour) to the end of the score of Gibson-Blackburne (Rd 11) - thanks to Gerard Killoran.
12 May 2018 Added the game Houlding-Stevens (Rd 8, Ladies' Championship). Thanks to Brian Denman, who comments that Mrs Emily Margaret Stevens was the sister of the well-known organiser and player of the time, Herbert Dobell.
2 November 2020 Added crosstables for the Ladies and Major Open competitions.
14 April 2021 Added one Championship game - Yates-F.Smith, Rd 4 - found in the Oxford Times; also six games from subsidiary groups (of a very poor standard): (1) WL.Biggs 1-0 RFS.Stevenson (Second-Class B); (2) WL.Biggs 1-0 AL.Densham (Second-Class B); (3) G.Wheeler 0-1 W.Hobbs (Third-Class B); (4) R.Moss 0-1 E.Walters (Third-Class C); (5) W.Hobbs 1-0 W.Hooppell (Third-Class D); (6) Miss K Eyre 0-1 A.Franks (Handicap). Plus complete crosstables for all sections plus a number of other minor details. EDIT (15 April 2021): two more subsidiary games added - FP.Wenman 1-0 NN (First Class) and TA.Sheldon 0-1 PO.Forshaw (Third-Class B).